TRANSKEI WILD COAST

 

From the Kei Mouth to Coffee Bay, beaches extending as far as the eye can see & delicious seafood fresh from the Indian ocean, not to mention the mystique of venturing into the unknown.
 

Transkei Wild Coast


The Wild Coast, known also as the Transkei, is a 250 kilometre long stretch of rugged and unspoiled coastline that stretches north of East London along sweeping bays, footprint-free beaches, lazy lagoons and rocky headlands. From marine safari activities to local cultural encounters and adrenaline adventures, the Wild Coast shows off with exquisite coastal scenery and outdoor excursions fit for the whole family.


The Transkei section of the Wild Coast is rural South Africa at its best and the roads to the coast lead the visitor through the Xhosa heartland, a stunning landscape of rolling green hills dotted with thatched rondavels, offering interesting glimpses into a culture far removed from the stresses of modern life.


Apart from Port St Johns and Coffee Bay, most villages north of the Kei River are made up of only a handful of fisherman's cottages, the occasional backpacker hostel and the odd hotel. There is a wealth of comfortable Wild Coast accommodation for the visitor, making it an ideal destination for peaceful, laid-back holidays away from the tourist hoards.


The Wild Coast is well known for its magnificent hiking trails, including the easy-going Strandloper Trail, which begins near Kei Mouth and passes through the Jikeleza Route villages, before terminating at Gonubie. Wrecks along this stretch of rugged coastline will stir the imagination and intrepid explorers will be thrilled by the pontoon adventure, as vehicles and passengers are ferried across the river at Kei Mouth. Famous landmarks include "the Gates" at Port St Johns, Hole in the Wall, Magwa Falls, Waterfall Bluff, the Jacaranda shipwreck, Nongqawuse's pools and the Morgan Bay cliffs.


The Wild Coast is well known for its magnificent hiking trails, including the easy-going Strandloper Trail, which begins near Kei Mouth and passes through the Jikeleza Route villages, before terminating at Gonubie. Wrecks along this stretch of rugged coastline will stir the imagination and intrepid explorers will be thrilled by the pontoon adventure, as vehicles and passengers are ferried across the river at Kei Mouth. Famous landmarks include the Morgan Bay cliffs, The Jacaranda shipwreck, The Gates and Nongqawuse's Pool near Trennerys Hotel, Dwesa Nature Reserve, Hole in the Wall, Magwa Falls and Waterfall Bluff.


The area is also a firm favourite with anglers, offering excellent fishing grounds both at the coast and in the estuaries, particularly at the mouths of the larger rivers like the Kei and Mzimvubu which are navigable for several kilometres upstream. Launching a ski boat for a day of deep-sea fishing is an exhilarating start to a wonderful day out at sea with magnificent views of the coast. Other Wild Coast activities include golf, fly fishing, mountain biking, rock climbing, abseiling, surfing, canoeing, horse riding, game viewing and bird watching.


A unique and much loved quirk of the Transkei is the frequent sightings visitors have of cows on the beaches. Even though beaches have no grass or drinking water, herds of cattle still love coming down to the beach to sleep, relax and chew the cud. They are easily approachable and make great photographic subjects.


From its people, to its unforgettable beaches, waterfalls and famous landmarks, the Transkei Wild Coast offers a wealth of things to see and experience. This coupled with a great climate, hot summers and mild dry winters, makes it an ideal tourist destination.
Whether you're a young adventure-seeking globetrotter, a family looking for a new and exciting holiday or a couple planning a romantic weekend, the Wild Coast offers everything you need.


Legendary Hole in the Wall


You have not done the Wild Coast unless you have been to the “Hole in the Wall”.
It is a rocky archway on the Wild Coast that was created millions of years ago by the relentless action of the waves crashing against the sandstone.


There is a little holiday village of the same name overlooking this rocky phenomenon located at the mouth of the Mpako River in Coffee Bay. Xhosa legend holds that this is the gateway to the world of their ancestors and they refer to it as “esiKhaleni”, which means “place of thunder” or “place of sound”.